Sugar Roses

As part of the Fair Cake cupcake courses I did the other week I also learned how to make roses!  These can be placed on cupcakes, or on wedding cakes!

There were two techniques that I learned which I will share with you, but first I want to explain the different types of icing you can use.

Fondant Icing / Sugar Paste:  Use this to cover cakes, like I did for the Camera Cake.

Modelling Paste:  This is used to make shapes which will sit on your cakes, and will dry harder than Sugar Paste or Flower Paste.  To make Modelling Paste mix 1tsp of Tylo Powder or GumTex for every 250g of Sugar Paste.  Make sure you keep it covered at all times, otherwise the air will start to dry it and it will become hard and brittle.

Flower Paste:  Use this to make flowers to decorate your cakes.  It is Flower Paste you should use to make these roses.

Small Rose

You will need:

  • Flower Paste
  • Colourant of your choice, Fair Cake recommend Americolor or Sugar Flair
  • Non Stick Board
  • Non Stick Rolling Pin
  • Piece of plastic

Method:

  1. Knead a small amount of Flower Paste until it is nice and warm and soft.
  2. Using the Flower Paste, create three small balls, the size of a chick pea, and one sausage the same length as two of the chickpea sized balls.  Place your shapes onto a non-stick plastic board.
  3. Place a piece of plastic over the balls and sausage of Flower Paste.
  4. Use your thumb to press down on the chickpea, to get a flattened circle.  Then run the side of your thumb around the outer edges of your circle.  This will ensure that the circle is slightly raised in the middle, with thinner edges.
  5. Do the same technique with the sausage, so that you end up with an flat oblong.
  6. Pick up the oblong shape (you may have to use a small paintbrush to ease it off of the board).  Roll the oblong from the shortest end, to create your inner rose, and using your fingers, mould the bottom part together, so that you have a thick stem at one end, and an inner rose at the other.
  7. Holding the stem of the inner rose in one hand, attach one of the circles to the stem, ensuring that the edge of the circle is the same height, or slightly higher than the inner rose.  Press down around the stem to make the circle stick, and roll it between your thumb and forefinger.  The heat of your hand will make it stick together.
  8. Attach the other two circles in the same way, around the stem, to create your rose.
  9. Break off the stem into a point, so that you just have the rose head
  10. You can use the same technique to create a five petal rose, by creating five small chickpea balls instead of only three.

Large Rose

You will need:

All materials can be bought from Fair Cake Online Store.  And if you are not sure what some of the equipment is below, Fair Cake have created this handy list on Rose Making Tools!

  • Flower Paste
  • Colourant of your choice, Fair Cake recommend Americolor or Sugar Flair
  • Edible Glue
  • Cake Decorating Rose Cutter
  • Large Ball & Shell Tool
  • Rolling Pin
  • Non-Stick plastic board and Non-stick rolling pin
  • Toothpick
  • Cel Buds (or this can be made with your Flower Paste, but may make your flower quite heavy).  NOTE: Use a 24ml Bud with a 100ml Flower cutter, or a 28 ml bud with a 110ml flower cutter.
  • Foam Pad

Method:

  1. Take your Cel Bud, or roll the shape out of a Flower Paste.  Stick a toothpick into the centre of the round bottom of your cel bud.
  2. Knead a small amount of Flower Paste to make it warm and flexible.
  3. Roll out a small piece of the Flower Paste into a circle.  This should be as thin (if not slightly thinner) than a 10 pence piece.  When you are rolling out the Flower Paste, keep turning it, otherwise it will stick to the board.
  4. Press down the Flower cutter, and lightly rub the flower cutter (with the Flower Paste stuck into the shape) on the foam pad.  This will ensure you have no ragged edges.  Carefully unpick the flower from the flower cutter and place on your board.
  5. Cut out one petal from the flower.
  6. Using the roller ball, roll around the edges of the flower on the foam pad.  This will give it a natural rose shape.
  7. Paint the edible glue using a small paintbrush onto the bottom half of the petal, and wrap it around the cell bud.  Leave it for a couple of minutes to dry.
  8. Knead another small piece of Flower Paste, and roll it out into a circle, like you did in section 3, making sure that you only use what you need, and that you cover the Flower Paste at every stage.
  9. Cut out the flower, rub it on the foam pad, and carefully unpick the flower out of the flower shape and place it on the foam pad.  Using your roller ball, roll around the edges of the petals.
  10. Carefully turn the flower shape over, by placing it on your hand and flipping it over.
  11. Using a tooth pick, carefully roll the outeredges, twice on each petal, so that you get a natural rose ‘v’ shaped petal.
  12. Turn the flower shape back over.
  13. Paint the edible glue into the centre of your flower, and on petal one and three, paint along the edge from the centre to half way up the petal.
  14. Place the flower shape onto your hand, and stick the toothpick through the centre, so that the toothpick goes between the gap of your fingers.
  15. Stick petal one up around the rose bud, and then petal three, and then all the other petals.  Make sure that the petals are the same height as your rose bud centre.
  16. Let it dry for a few minutes.
  17. Repeat sections 8-16,  however, this time paint half way up all the rose petals.
  18. Repeat section 17, until you have as full as a rose as you want.  You many need to start to add the flower shapes upside down as the flower gets heavier.
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